October 8th, 2013 Day 2 on the Miss. & anchoring out

12 Oct
This tug & barges was 20 barges.  We passed some with 24 barges today

This tug & barges was 20 barges. We passed some with 24 barges today

This bardg & tug passed our anchorage shortly after we got here.  Those are 4'waves the tug creates behind her that we encounter at least half the tugs we pass & that was more than 18 today

This bardg & tug passed our anchorage shortly after we got here. Those are 4’waves the tug creates behind her that we encounter at least half the tugs we pass & that was more than 18 today

This bardg & tug passed our anchorage shortly after we got here.  Those are 4'waves the tug creates behind her that we encounter at least half the tugs we pass & that was more than 18 today

This bardg & tug passed our anchorage shortly after we got here. Those are 4’waves the tug creates behind her that we encounter at least half the tugs we pass & that was more than 18 today

A dredge barge we passed today 10/8/13 after leaving Hoppie's

A dredge barge we passed today 10/8/13 after leaving Hoppie’s

 

Planned to leave Hoppie’s early, but when we got up the fog was very thick.  We hated to wait because we had to go 80 miles to the anchorage Fern told us about.  Finally we got under way at 9:00 and we still hit some fog down stream, luckily it didn’t last long.

There were wing dams everywhere, which seems to help collect the sand as it goes down river.  I don’t know if their intension is to make the river narrower or what, but that seems to be what they are doing.  There are huge sand bars, some almost go all across the river, which makes the passage very narrow on the curves.  Em would contact a barge that was coming our way and ask them which side they wanted us to pass on.  Several times they confused us by saying on the “one” and then the tug didn’t give us the room to pass so we went on the two.  I prefer to have them tell me on the red or green.

We also have to be very diligent about watching for logs floating down river and I do mean logs.  Hoppie told me that the logs could have come from the dredging, from the rains they had in Colorado and then down the Missouri or from the tugs pushing up river with a full load.  That is why you never get in back of the tugs to close.  You ride on either side to the tugs.  Their prop wash is very turbulent and it can really throw the boat around.

We arrived in good time for the first anchorage that Fern told us to stop at.  It was an L shaped wing dam at mile 78 with a deep anchorage.  It was one of the best night sleeps that we had.  The Asian carps were jumping all night, but not out of the water.

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